Plastic Pollution Grade 7: Module 4: Unit 1: Lesson 3 Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 3 SL.7.2 (Example for Teacher Reference) Directions: As you enter class, read the following excerpt from the film transcript that you will study in this lesson. Then respond in writing to the prompts below. TRANSCRIPT: Looking out over the vast expanse of clear, sparkling water, there is no plastic in sight. (indistinct chatter) The contents of the trawl are emptied and floated. The tiny pieces of plastic then reveal themselves to Jo and Dr. Neal. TANYA: Scientists estimate that there are more than five trillion pieces of plastic afloat in our oceans worldwide. CRAIG: There is no floating island of plastic. What exists is far more insidious. What exists is a kind of plastic smog. These tiny pieces of plastic that are floating on the surface of the ocean come from larger pieces. Over time, the sun’s ultraviolet light, ocean wave action, and salt break it up into smaller pieces called microplastics. Microplastics have rough, pitted surfaces. Waterborne chemicals from industry and agriculture stick to microplastics, making them toxic poison pills. (27:04–28:14) 1. What is the gist of this excerpt? Plastic in the ocean has become microplastics, broken down by ocean and sun; chemicals make microplastics poisonous. 2. What thoughts or questions do you have about it? Answers will vary, but may include: It is overwhelming and troubling to read and know that plastics in the ocean have broken down into tiny pieces that we can’t remove and that bond with poisonous chemicals. I have many questions: Is there any way to remove microplastics from the ocean? Do ocean animals eat microplastics? Do the animals die from the poison? Is anyone doing anything to help? Source: Transcribed from A Plastic Ocean. Directed by Craig Leeson. Brainstorm Media, 2017. Used by permission of A Plastic Ocean Foundation. 1 © 2019 EL Education Inc. Plastic Pollution Grade 7: Module 4: Unit 1: Lesson 3 Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 3 SL.7.2 Name: Date: Directions: As you enter class, read the following excerpt from the film transcript that you will study in this lesson. Then respond in writing to the prompts below. TRANSCRIPT: Looking out over the vast expanse of clear, sparkling water, there is no plastic in sight. (indistinct chatter) The contents of the trawl are emptied and floated. The tiny pieces of plastic then reveal themselves to Jo and Dr. Neal. TANYA: Scientists estimate that there are more than five trillion pieces of plastic afloat in our oceans worldwide. CRAIG: There is no floating island of plastic. What exists is far more insidious. What exists is a kind of plastic smog. These tiny pieces of plastic that are floating on the surface of the ocean come from larger pieces. Over time, the sun’s ultraviolet light, ocean wave action, and salt break it up into smaller pieces called microplastics. Microplastics have rough, pitted surfaces. Waterborne chemicals from industry and agriculture stick to microplastics, making them toxic poison pills. (27:04–28:14) 1. What is the gist of this excerpt? _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ 2. What thoughts or questions do you have about it? _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ Source: Transcribed from A Plastic Ocean. Directed by Craig Leeson. Brainstorm Media, 2017. Used by permission of A Plastic Ocean Foundation. 2 © 2019 EL Education Inc. Plastic Pollution Grade 7: Module 4: Unit 1: Lesson 3  Analyze A Plastic Ocean (25:48–28:56) Note-Catcher RI.7.7, SL.7.2, SL.7.3 (Example for Teacher Reference) Part I Directions: Use this chart to analyze the clip from A Plastic Ocean. Use the box labelled “Common Techniques in a Video” as a reference for your analysis. Common Techniques in a Video (for reference) specific images, video, maps, graphics, narration, interviews, music Main Ideas: One main idea is that a plastic garbage patch is made of tiny pieces of plastic. Another main idea is that plastic is toxic to life in the ocean.

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